CGI and Smartmatic to deliver electronic vote counting solution for 2020 London elections

CGI and Smartmatic to deliver electronic vote counting solution for 2020 London elections

London, United Kingdom – 13 December, 2018 – Smartmatic, the London-based world’s leading elections company, is joining forces with CGI, one of the largest independent IT consulting services firms in the world, to deliver end-to-end services, software and technical infrastructure for the electronic counting of votes in the 2020 London elections.

CGI and Smartmatic will provide an electronic solution for the accurate counting of voter marks on ballot papers and declaration of results for three elections taking place in May 2020: the Mayor of London, 14 Constituency Assembly Members, and 11 London-wide Assembly Members. Postal and in-person votes will be counted in three count venues across London (Alexandra Palace, Excel and Olympia).
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[The Sunday Times] Airbubbl, a new in-car air purifier claimed to remove NO2, particulates and more from the cabin

[The Sunday Times] Airbubbl, a new in-car air purifier claimed to remove NO2, particulates and more from the cabin

In July this year, the Sunday Times reported on a study by Emissions Analytics of 11 vehicles that revealed some small cars like the VW Polo and Ford Fiesta are the most likely to act as traps for toxins. The larger, more expensive Mercedes E-Class, it found, removed 90% of toxic particles, even in heavy traffic. A test by a BBC reporter in 2016 also showed that his own car did a good job of stripping the air entering the cabin of particulate matter.

However, no car’s filters can remove nitrogen dioxide gas from the air, according to Gareth Jones, Commercial Director of Airlabs, a British and Danish start-up that specialises in cleaning air; not even Teslas, with their large HEPA filters and “Bioweapon Defense” mode. That means that even if you and your family are travelling around in a pure-electric car, with zero tailpipe emissions, you’re all still breathing in the toxic gases from the other vehicles around you.
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[Sky News] Nanocarbons give London commuters a breath of fresh air

[Sky News] Nanocarbons give London commuters a breath of fresh air

Marylebone in central London has some of the worst air pollution levels in the country due to its congested roads.

But the 60,000 commuters passing through the railway station every day will now breathe air that is 95% cleaner.

Four new filtering chambers have been fitted in the station to create clean air zones.

The units suck in dirty air at the top, which is passed through three big filters inside to remove particulate matter and nitrogen oxide from the air.
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[London Live] Marylebone Station becomes London’s first ‘clean air station’

[London Live] Marylebone Station becomes London’s first ‘clean air station’

London’s Marylebone Station is set to become home to innovative air cleaning technology, with the launch of four large clean air zones.

The installation, which marks United Nations World Cities Day (WCD), has been designed by Airlabs – a team of atmospheric chemists and airflow engineers dedicated to reducing people’s exposure to air pollution.

The initiative adapts traditional Out Of Home (OOH) advertising space to emit clean air in the area immediately around the units, significantly improving air quality and creating a healthier environment to live and work. It is being led by BNP Paribas, in partnership with Airlabs, Chiltern Railways, and JC Decaux.
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[Financial Times] Air pollution: why London struggles to breathe

[Financial Times] Air pollution: why London struggles to breathe

Four years ago Sophie Power was walking along Marylebone Road, thinking of the son she was pregnant with at the time. The buses, lorries and cabs clogging the central London thoroughfare  make it one of the most polluted places  in the UK.
“I wondered how to protect him,” she says, pointing to a study that found children in polluted areas develop stunted lung capacity that is 8 to 10 per cent smaller as a result. “The pollution inevitably has an impact,” she says.

Although London’s air often appears clear to the naked eye, the city has suffered from illegal levels  of air pollution since 2010, with particularly dangerous levels of nitrogen dioxide, which comes mainly from diesel vehicles. This summer’s unusually hot and sunny weather has caused surges in ozone — produced when sunlight reacts with nitrogen dioxide — that have prompted multiple pollution warnings.

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